We Three Girls

Ghana | Google Maps

Back when we was just girls, we three, we’d walk back on Sundays, red dust kicking up on church shoes, Mawusi always in the blue dress—and we’d share her an ear of tender corn, or some days two fists of banku, and we’d walk slow so she had time to eat it, talkin’ bout things the preacher said, and which we thought was sinning most—them sneaking in late to the back row still smelling like Saturday rum—us making Mawusi laugh teasing her ‘bout Teon who said he’d marry her someday. But he didn’t have a slant roof over his fool head, and no prospects beyond a strong arm. The only thing that boy was rich in was love for poor Mawusi, her with the hungry ma and the seven sisters, their eyes as big as empty plates.

Don’t know why she had to go and marry Big Aagha.

151 words

This has been an edition of What Pegman Saw. To read more stories inspired by the prompt or to submit your own, click here.

22 Comments

  1. Splendid rhythm and language in this piece. You imply the lilting African dialect without spelling it out, a tough thing to do. I like how the last line implies multiple possibilities: Big Aagha could be a wealthy, cruel despot or just a reminder of the fickle nature of fortune…or anything, really. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you kindly! It was a fun one to write.

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  2. I loved the “voice.”

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What a delightful story, Karen! I love the way you show how poor Mawusi’s family are by describing the girls feeding her on Sunday as they walk home from church. I love the way you have them argue over who’s sinned most. And, like Josh, I like the last line very much, with its multitude of possibilities.

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    1. Thanks so much Penny! Glad you liked it.

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  4. Wonderfully done, Karen. We all wonder why she had to go and marry Big Aagha.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Dale! I think I know why she might have married him but it’s still a shame 🙂

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  5. A touching tale filled with empathy. I hope Big Aagha was kind to Mawusi.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hope so. Thanks for reading!

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  6. […] and commenting on others’ work is part of the fun! Thanks as always to Karen and Josh for […]

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  7. Dear Karen,

    As others have already said, the voice is magnificent and feels authentic. You tell us so much about Mawusi in few words. I have the feeling that her marriage might not have been her choice. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rochelle, you are most kind. I have a feeling you’re right about Muwasi. Thanks for reading!

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  8. Casual hometown voices here, with only passing references to want and deprivation, but no self-pitying dwelling on it. I like the eyes as big as empty plates. And seven sisters! In her town, that may mean mouths to feed but no one to bring home money, which would explain the decision to marry up, out of duty. At least she has friends.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I like your perspective. Thanks for reading and commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. like all the others here…
    I like the last line very much, with its multitude of possibilities
    and this reminded me about change too – and how it can so hard

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Change can be difficult for sure. Thanks for reading and commenting.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I also ‘like the voice’- feel like I’m there walking beside them. Good writing.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much Francine!

      Like

  11. Abhijit Ray

    Those good old days of childhood. When one had dreams, not marred by reality of life.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I hope she and Big Aagha were both in love when they married.

    Liked by 1 person

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